ClickMonitorDCC: control your monitor’s brightness and contrast

Read the full article at ghacks.net.

“ClickMonitorDCC is an excellent program when it comes to configuring the brightness, contrast, volume and RGB values of connected displays. It works well with single monitor systems but also with multi-monitor setups.

While it is designed to make things faster for all users, it is especially useful if one or multiple displays don’t support options to change these parameters easily, or at all.”

There’s Now A USB Device That Can Fry Even More Electronics

This article originally appeared at consumerist.com.

“Hey, remember the USB Killer, a device that looks like a thumb drive and lets you destroy 95% of computers by frying them with a quick jolt of electricity? There’s now an improved version on the market, which is more powerful, looks more like any generic thumb drive, and comes with micro USB, USB-C, and Apple Lightning adapters, allowing you to fry a wider variety of electronics.

How do you know whether your device is vulnerable to attacks with a similar computer-frying stick? You don’t. A video compilation shows the new version’s Lightning port destroying an iPhone 7 and at least briefly confusing an iPad Pro. The only way to stop an attack on a vulnerable system is to physically keep anyone from accessing the USB ports, so good luck with that. Hope you don’t know anyone vindictive enough to try this.”

Go ahead. Read the whole article at consumerist.com.

How some Pixar effects are created

Original source: metafilter.com

Many of Pixar’s films can seem like magic, and while much of that relies on storytelling, the art of animation has many, many, many skills in it. Pixar has partnered with the Khan Academy to provide a free practical introduction to how the best-of-the-best do their job. Because who doesn’t want to understand how you simulate hair?

Note: The original Metafilter article contains links that I have not reproduced here.

Diceware passwords now need six random words to thwart hackers

Diceware creator Arnold Reinhold wrote “Six words may be breakable by an organization with a very large budget, such as a large country’s security agency. Seven words and longer are unbreakable with any known technology, but may be within the range of large organizations by around 2030. Eight words should be completely secure through 2050.”

Read the full article at arstechnica.com.