Transforming the experience of deafness

A New York Times article with an amazing video: www.nytimes.com

“How does augmenting a sense fundamentally shift the human experience, particularly in deaf kids?

Our search for the answers became this film. We interviewed 14 of Dr. Madell’s former patients, those young enough to be born after cochlear implantation was viable yet old enough to have insight into the experience. They had navigated the frontiers of deafness, disability and the human experience. They spoke to us about identity, sexual intimacy and coming of age somewhere between sound and silence.

And they talked about the sometimes wrenching decision of whether to hear or not. That’s a choice most of us will never make.”


Google searches:

[cochlear implant], videos

[hearing aids]. videos

[deafness], videos

It’s about time

“A generation ago, computing usually took place in a single mainframe or personal computer. Now it is routinely spread across thousands of independent processors in machines that can be separated by a few feet or entire continents.

Chip designers have long struggled to maintain the precise timing needed to order mathematical operations inside individual computing chips. And synchronizing these vast ensembles of them has become the limiting factor in the speed and processing power of what Google describes as “planetary-scale” computers.”

Read the whole interesting article at www.nytimes.com.

Deceived by Design

“User-experience designers and marketers are well aware that many people are so eager to start using a new service or complete a task, or are so loath to lose a perceived deal, that they will often click one “Next” button after another as if on autopilot — without necessarily understanding the terms they have agreed to along the way.” — www.nytimes.com

The Norwegian Consumer Council (Forbrukerrådet), a government agency that promotes and protects the rights of consumers, has published a report in English [pdf link] on how Facebook, Google and Windows 10 use dark patterns to manipulate users.” — www.metafilter.com

“In graphic and web design, a dark pattern is “a user interface that has been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills.”[1][2][3] The neologism dark pattern was coined by Harry Brignull in August 2010 with the registration of darkpatterns.org, a “pattern library with the specific goal of naming and shaming deceptive user interfaces.” — wikipedia.org

It’s About Time

Synchronous electric clocks count the oscillations of the mains current to keep time: After 50 or 60 cycles (depending on where you are in the world), one second has elapsed. This works wonderfully as long as the average mains frequency is constant, or—in practice—adjusted to compensate for errors. Things get a little tricky when 113 GWh of energy somehow go missing and all microwave clocks on an entire continent go slow…” — www.metafilter.com.

It’s an interesting article, IMO. Be sure to read the comments and to check out this Wiki item: wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_clock#Accuracy.