March 8, 2020 Meeting

Video Conferencing with Zoom
Maurice Green

In light of the current concerns about the Coronavirus it has been decided that we avoid contacts in unnecessary group meetings, especially given the high risk factors for members of our group. So we will not have our usual monthly meeting at the Elks Lodge. Instead, the meeting will be conducted by, and the topic will be, Zoom Videoconferencing

This will be a live hands-on session. Maury will review the basic operating procedures of the Zoom software system, including screen sharing, white boarding, participant comments, polls  and discussions. We will encourage participants to share the hosting and engage in a ‘random access’ type  discussion. i.e. You will be able to demonstrate a problem or new software on your computer and all participants would be able to see it. 

Participants may join the meeting with video and audio capability using their desktop or laptop computers or smart phones equipped with camera and microphone. If you don’t already have the Zoom client software installed on your device, the system will install it for you when you join the conference. For those who only want to listen to the discussion, you can join the meeting via telephone. The meeting will be automatically recorded for future viewing. 

The meeting will begin at 7PM. Participants may join earlier in the ‘waiting room’. Your computer microphones will be muted when you first join. Here are the links for the meeting. See you Wednesday evening.

Topic: SPAUG meeting March 2020
Time: Mar 11, 2020 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/812782630

Meeting ID: 812 782 630

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+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
Meeting ID: 812 782 630

February 12, 2020 Meeting

Highlights of CES 2020

Andy Marken returns to SPAUG to review the highlights and the best new products of the 2020 Consumer Electronics Show.

If it wasn’t at CES this year it probably isn’t worth considering -nearly 4500 companies from over 160 countries, over 100 educational/informational sessions covering everything was there this January.  Think of the show as the UN and Davos of consumer technology. Lots of talk about 5G and AI but you couldn’t touch it, play with it so they’re just nice talking points.  Andy will return again to cover the highlights of smart everything – cars, TVs, toys, games, homes, cities, streaming content and more. 

No, he didn’t cover all 20 football fields of exhibit space but still there was plenty of really good stuff and lots of stuff that won’t be back next year (hint – we’ll try not to let you know about those so as not to build false hopes).  All we can say is that the show keeps getting bigger/better, attracting companies from every business segment around the globe. But as in recent years and did all the hard leg work for you to ferret out the good stuff! If you heard rumors about stuff and he doesn’t mention it during the meeting…sorry!  However listen hard and come with your questions…he’ll fill in the blanks!

Andy Marken is President of Marken Communications and has been involved in the marketing of storage technology for more than 25 years. His experience includes work with Panasonic, Verbatim, Matsushita, Plasmon, Nikon, Mitsubishi Chemical, OWC, Newertech and a number of storage solution manufacturers Andy can be reached at andy@markencom.com.

The meeting will be held at the Palo Alto Elks Lodge, 4249 El Camino Real, Palo Alto and begins at 7PM. We will be meeting in the Conference Room on the second floor.

For those who enjoy the schmooze, we will have our usual no-host pre-meeting dinner st 5:30PM in the Bistro Café on the first floor of the lodge.

For those who can’t attend in person,
this meeting will also be available on our Zoom channel:

Meeting ID: 329 198 601
Join Zoom Meeting at
https://zoom.us/j/329198601

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+16465588656,,329198601# US (New York)

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+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)

Playing in the Sandbox

January 8, 2020 Meeting

Running Windows on a Linux OS
Bill Young

Running Linux on a Windows OS
Maurice Green

Virtual machines allow you to run an operating system in an app window on your desktop that behaves like a full, separate computer. You can use them play around with different operating systems, run software your main operating system can’t, and try out apps in a safe, sandboxed environment.

Bill and Maury will demonstrate using a virtual computer to run multiple operating systems at the same time. A virtual computer is a software computer that, like a physical computer, runs an operating system and applications. It is a software program that exhibits the behavior of a separate computer and can run applications in the separate computer. If you have Windows 7 programs that will not run on Windows 10, you could use a virtual computer to run a Windows 7 computer and the applications on a physical Windows 10 computer

As usual, the meeting will be held at the Palo Alto Elks Lodge, 4249 El Camino Real, Palo Alto and begins at 7PM. We will be meeting in the Conference Room on the second floor.

For those who enjoy the schmooze, we will have our usual no-host pre-meeting dinner at 5:30PM in the Bistro Café on the first floor of the lodge.

NOTE: This meeting will NOT be available online via ZOOM.

Managing Your Passwords

October 16, 2019 Meeting

Maurice Green, PhD
President/Webmaster, SPAUG

A password manager is a piece of software that remembers passwords, so you don’t have to. By remembering a single master password, all of your other passwords are stored securely for retrieval as and when you need them.

Maury will discuss the properties and use of strong passwords to secure your online accounts and describe a number of available paid and free password managers.

As usual, the meeting will be held at the Palo Alto Elks Lodge, 4249 El Camino Real, Palo Alto and begins at 7PM. We will be meeting in the Library on the second floor.

For those who enjoy the schmooze, we will have our usual no-host pre-meeting dinner at 5:30PM in the Bistro Café on the first floor of the lodge.

NOTE: This meeting will be available online via ZOOM.
The online session will start at 7PM.

To join the Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/230051280

Meeting ID: 230 051 280

One tap mobile
+16699006833,,230051280# US (San Jose)
+16465588656,,230051280# US (New York)

Dial by your location
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
Meeting ID: 230 051 280
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/a58fvHPfC

Phishing Attacks: How to Spot Them

WHAT IS PHISHING &
HOW ARE HACKERS USING IT?
Steve von Ehrenkrook,  CJS Associates

While the number of people falling for sending personal information to the crown prince of Nigeria in hopes of receiving his promised wealth and riches seems to be dropping, phishing remains a major issue. In fact, the number of phishing campaigns pursued by hackers around the world increased 65% in the last year.

What exactly is phishing? Hackers mimic the emails, forms, and websites of legitimate companies in an effort to lure people into providing their private, personal information, like credit cards numbers, social security information, account logins, and personal identifiers. The victim typically doesn’t realize they’ve been compromised until long after the event, and oftentimes only after their identify or finances are affected. In the past, an attack was carried out relatively quickly. As soon as the victim gave up their information, the hacker moved in and stole money from the compromised bank account. Today, it’s often more lucrative for hackers to sell that information on the Dark Web, resulting in longer-lasting, even more devastating attacks.

3 Types Of Phishing Attacks

Spear Phishing

Phishing attempts directed at specific individuals or companies have been termed spear phishing. Attackers may gather personal information about their target to increase their probability of success. This technique is by far the most successful on the Internet today, accounting for 91% of attacks.

Threat Group-4127 used spear phishing tactics to target email accounts linked to Hillary Clinton‘s 2016 presidential campaign. They attacked more than 1,800 Google accounts and implemented accounts-google.com domain to threaten targeted users.

Clone Phishing

Clone phishing is a type of phishing attack whereby a legitimate, and previously delivered, email containing an attachment or link has had its content and recipient address(es) taken and used to create an almost identical or cloned email. The attachment or link within the email is replaced with a malicious version and then sent from an email address spoofed to appear to come from the original sender. It may claim to be a resend of the original or an updated version to the original. This technique could be used to pivot (indirectly) from a previously infected machine and gain a foothold on another machine, by exploiting the social trust associated with the inferred connection due to both parties receiving the original email.

Whaling

Several phishing attacks have been directed specifically at senior executives and other high-profile targets within businesses, and the term whaling has been coined for these kinds of attacks. In the case of whaling, the masquerading web page/email will take a more serious executive-level form. The content will be crafted to target an upper manager and the person’s role in the company. The content of a whaling attack email is often written as a legal subpoena, customer complaint, or executive issue. Whaling scam emails are designed to masquerade as a critical business email, sent from a legitimate business authority. The content is meant to be tailored for upper management, and usually involves some kind of falsified company-wide concern. Whaling phishers have also forged official-looking FBI subpoena emails, and claimed that the manager needs to click a link and install special software to view the subpoena.

Have you ever gotten an email from your bank or medical office asking you to update your information online or confirm your username and password? Maybe a suspicious email from your boss asking you to execute some wire transfer. That is most likely a spear phishing attempt, and you’re among the 76% of businesses that were victims of a phishing attack in the last year.

Method Of Delivery

Phishing scams are not always received through email and hackers are getting trickier and trickier with their preferred method of execution. Last year, in 2017, officials caught on to attacks using SMS texting (smishing)Voice phishing (vishing) or social engineering, a method in which users can be encouraged to click on various kinds of unexpected content for a variety of technical and social reasons.

Ransomware: The Consequence

Phishing is the most widely used method for spreading ransomware, and has increased significantly since the birth of major ransomware viruses like Petya and Wannacry. Anyone can become a victim of phishing, and, in turn, ransomware attacks; however, hackers have begun targeting organizations that are more likely to pay the ransoms. Small businesses, education, government, and healthcare often, unfortunately, don’t have valid data backups, so they are unable to roll back to a pre-ransomed version of their data. Instead, they have to pay their way out or cease to exist. Outside of ransom costs, victims of phishing campaigns are often branded as untrustworthy, and many of their customers turn to their competitors, resulting in even greater financial loss.

Why are effective phishing campaigns so rampant despite public awareness from media coverage?

Volume: There are nearly 5 million new phishing sites created every month, according to Webroot Threat Report. There are now even Phishing as a Service companies, offering phishing attacks in exchange for payment. One Russian website, “Fake Game,” claims over 61,000 subscribers and 680,000 credentials stolen.

They Work: Over 30% of phishing messages get opened, and 12% of targets click on the embedded attachments or links, according to the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. In short, these hackers have gotten really good at looking really legitimate.

They’re simple to Execute: New phishing campaigns and sites can be built by sophisticated hackers in a matter of minutes. While we think there are far more legitimate ways to be earning money, these individuals have made a living out of duplicating their successful campaigns.

How do you protect yourself from a phishing attack?

Now that you have an understanding of what phishing is, the next part will teach you How to Spot a Phishing Attack.

Would you know if you were the subject of a phishing attack? Many people claim that they’d be able to tell right away if they received an email from an illegitimate source. If that were the case, there wouldn’t be 1.5 million new phishing sites every month, a 65% increase in attacks in the last year, and hackers would have moved on to their next idea for swindling people out of their identities and money. How do you spot a phishing attack and avoid falling victim yourself?

Look For These Red Flags:

  1. Sender Email Address: Always check to make sure that the email address is legitimate. Amateur hackers will send things from Gmail or Hotmail accounts and hope you don’t notice. More sophisticated hackers will closely mimic an actual email domain, like amazonprime.com rather than amazon.com. Double check the email address before responding, clicking, or opening, even if the from name appears correct.
  2. Discrepancies in Writing Format: If the attack is coming from overseas, you’re likely to notice some small issues in writing format, like writing a date as 4th April, 2018 rather than April 4, 2018. While this is subtle, it should be a red flag.
  3. Grammar Issues: We all fall victim to the occasional typo, but if you receive an email riddled with grammar and spelling mistakes, consider the source. It’s likely a hacker, especially if the email supposedly comes from a major organization.
  4. Sender Name: This one is also difficult to track, but phishing emails will typically close with a very generic name to avoid raising suspicion. You should recognize the people that send you emails, or at the very least, clearly understand their role at the organization.
  5. Link Destination: Before you click on any link in an email, hover over it. The destination URL should pop up. Check out the domain name of this URL. Similar to the sender email address, make sure that this address is legitimate before clicking.
  6. Attachments: Is it realistic to expect an attachment from this sender? Rule of thumb, don’t open any attachment you don’t expect to receive, whether it’s a Zip file, PDF or otherwise. The payload for a ransomware attack often hides inside.
  7. Email Design: A cooky font like Comic Sans should immediately raise red flags if you don’t clearly recognize the sender.
  8. Links to Verify Information: Never, ever click on a link to verify information. Instead, if you think the information does need updating, go directly to the website. Type in your email and password, and update your information from the Account tab. Always go directly to the source.
  9. Odd Logo Use: Hackers try their best to mimic the site’s look and feel. Oftentimes, they get very close; but they won’t be perfect. If something feels off, it probably is.

While there is no fool-proof method for avoiding falling victim to a phishing attack, knowing how to spot likely culprits is one step in the right direction.