YT Video: Frank Abagnale: “Catch Me If You Can” | Talks at Google

Verrrry Interesting. Watch it here www.youtube.com.

“His transformation from one of the world’s most notorious con men to an international cybersecurity expert trusted by the FBI has been mythologized in film and literature – but the takeaways he shares are the real deal. Frank’s contributions to the world of security are immeasurable. He has become a hero to hundreds of public and private sector organizations for his indispensable counsel and strategic insight on safeguarding information systems and combating cyber-fraud. With an eye on the latest techniques developed by high-tech criminals to deceive and defraud, Frank leaves audiences with a deep understanding of today’s evolving security landscape, and more importantly, a vision of how to make the world a safer place.”

The Security of Cellular Connections

This is excerpted from a New York Times article.

“That free Wi-Fi network may not be so free if it is unsecured and someone hijacks your data. Your phone’s cellular data connection offers more protection.

If you are unfamiliar with the available wireless network nearby and want to be as safe as possible, stick with the LTE data connection. If your data plan is limited or you need more speed than what the cellular network offers, use a virtual private network like F-Secure’s Freedome VPN or Private Internet Access to encrypt your Wi-Fi connection.”

Deceived by Design

“User-experience designers and marketers are well aware that many people are so eager to start using a new service or complete a task, or are so loath to lose a perceived deal, that they will often click one “Next” button after another as if on autopilot — without necessarily understanding the terms they have agreed to along the way.” — www.nytimes.com

The Norwegian Consumer Council (Forbrukerrådet), a government agency that promotes and protects the rights of consumers, has published a report in English [pdf link] on how Facebook, Google and Windows 10 use dark patterns to manipulate users.” — www.metafilter.com

“In graphic and web design, a dark pattern is “a user interface that has been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills.”[1][2][3] The neologism dark pattern was coined by Harry Brignull in August 2010 with the registration of darkpatterns.org, a “pattern library with the specific goal of naming and shaming deceptive user interfaces.” — wikipedia.org

Dash Cams: Coming To A Dashboard Near You

“Dash cams are small video cameras (priced from $50 to more than $200) that can be mounted to your car’s dashboard or windshield to record what happens in front of the vehicle. More advanced models can also record interior audio and video, and rear-facing video, and even display on your rearview mirror or stream to the internet.”

This linked consumerist.com article provides five of the top reasons people buy one, and also compares some models and features: consumerist.com

Kill the Password: A String of Characters Won’t Protect You

The full article originally appeared at www.wired.com.

“What we can say for sure is this: Access to our data can no longer hinge on secrets—a string of characters, 10 strings of characters, the answers to 50 questions—that only we’re supposed to know. The Internet doesn’t do secrets. Everyone is a few clicks away from knowing everything.

Instead, our new system will need to hinge on who we are and what we do: where we go and when, what we have with us, how we act when we’re there. And each vital account will need to cue off many such pieces of information—not just two, and definitely not just one.”

“In many ways, our data providers will learn to think somewhat like credit card companies do today: monitoring patterns to flag anomalies, then shutting down activity if it seems like fraud. “A lot of what you’ll see is that sort of risk analytics,” Grant says. “Providers will be able to see where you’re logging in from, what kind of operating system you’re using.””