How a Bunch of Lava Lamps Protect Us From Hackers

Remember lava lamps? turns out, they’re like tiny universes. After the bulb’s heat distributes fully throughout the lamp’s interior fluids, spherical globules in various pastel colors and sizes begin to move slowly and silently about exactly as the natural laws of physics and fluid behavior require. Smaller globules coalesce into larger ones, then disassemble and separately join with others. Some globules at the base stretch languorously upward, merging with random spheres hovering at the top, and then both reform into a single, larger sphere, and then break apart and reform yet again. Some small globules independently slide around in the fluid, occasionally bumping into one another but bouncing off and traveling on independently.
Read the article at www.patheos.com.

The paragraph below describes how Cloudflare uses lava lamps to generate random numbers.
“Every time you log in to any website, you’re assigned a unique identification number. It should be random, because if hackers can predict the number, they’ll impersonate you. Computers, relying as they do on human-coded patterns, can’t generate true randomness—but nobody can predict the goopy mesmeric swirlings of oil, water, and wax. Cloudflare films the lamps 24/7 and uses the ever-changing arrangement of pixels to help create a superpowered cryptographic key. “Anything that the camera captures gets incorporated into the randomness,” says Nick Sullivan, the company’s head of cryptography, and that includes visitors milling about and light streaming through the windows. (Any change in heat subtly affects the undulations of those glistening globules.)”
Read the article at wired.com.

Google search [The Lava Lamps That Help Keep The Internet Secure]:  www.google.com.

YT Video: Frank Abagnale: “Catch Me If You Can” | Talks at Google

Verrrry Interesting. Watch it here www.youtube.com.

“His transformation from one of the world’s most notorious con men to an international cybersecurity expert trusted by the FBI has been mythologized in film and literature – but the takeaways he shares are the real deal. Frank’s contributions to the world of security are immeasurable. He has become a hero to hundreds of public and private sector organizations for his indispensable counsel and strategic insight on safeguarding information systems and combating cyber-fraud. With an eye on the latest techniques developed by high-tech criminals to deceive and defraud, Frank leaves audiences with a deep understanding of today’s evolving security landscape, and more importantly, a vision of how to make the world a safer place.”

The Security of Cellular Connections

This is excerpted from a New York Times article.

“That free Wi-Fi network may not be so free if it is unsecured and someone hijacks your data. Your phone’s cellular data connection offers more protection.

If you are unfamiliar with the available wireless network nearby and want to be as safe as possible, stick with the LTE data connection. If your data plan is limited or you need more speed than what the cellular network offers, use a virtual private network like F-Secure’s Freedome VPN or Private Internet Access to encrypt your Wi-Fi connection.”

Deceived by Design

“User-experience designers and marketers are well aware that many people are so eager to start using a new service or complete a task, or are so loath to lose a perceived deal, that they will often click one “Next” button after another as if on autopilot — without necessarily understanding the terms they have agreed to along the way.” — www.nytimes.com

The Norwegian Consumer Council (Forbrukerrådet), a government agency that promotes and protects the rights of consumers, has published a report in English [pdf link] on how Facebook, Google and Windows 10 use dark patterns to manipulate users.” — www.metafilter.com

“In graphic and web design, a dark pattern is “a user interface that has been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills.”[1][2][3] The neologism dark pattern was coined by Harry Brignull in August 2010 with the registration of darkpatterns.org, a “pattern library with the specific goal of naming and shaming deceptive user interfaces.” — wikipedia.org

Dash Cams: Coming To A Dashboard Near You

“Dash cams are small video cameras (priced from $50 to more than $200) that can be mounted to your car’s dashboard or windshield to record what happens in front of the vehicle. More advanced models can also record interior audio and video, and rear-facing video, and even display on your rearview mirror or stream to the internet.”

This linked consumerist.com article provides five of the top reasons people buy one, and also compares some models and features: consumerist.com